Don Tillman has always been a little bit…different. He can count his friends on one hand, is distant from his family, and as a professor of genetics, he hasn’t made it onto the dean’s good side. His life is dictated by a very rigid schedule and he likes it that way. When Don decides it’s time to find a wife, he approaches the problem in the same manner he approaches all things– systematically. Creating a questionnaire, he attempts to control all the undesirable traits. No smoking, must be intelligent, under a certain BMI. When his friend Gene sends Rosie into his office, he is startled. She’s the exact opposite of what he had in mind; she works as a bartender, she’s a vegetarian that is willing to eat fish as long as it’s sustainable, and she smokes. But she’s also trying to solve a problem and Don can’t resist helping her. In the process, he gains an unlikely friend. Will it lead to more despite not fitting what he wanted?

I loved this book. Though I wasn’t sure if I would, it was something that I craved coming back to at the end of the day and I couldn’t wait to see what happened. It seemed to be the brain child of the movie “As Good As it Gets” and the novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nightime. I loved following his trains of thought, and how unexpectedly amusing Don was as a person. There was great character development and the story exuded warmth and left me feeling happy and uplifted. After a string of not-so-satisfying reads, this was a wonderful change of pace.

Have you read The Rosie Project? What did you think?

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